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Diversity & Immigration in Buenos Aires By Leor Szleifer

The majority of porteños have European origins, mostly from the Calabrian, Ligurian, Piedmont, Lombardy, Sicily and Campania regions of Italy and from the Andalusian, Galician, Asturian, and Basque regions of Spain. Unrestricted waves of European immigrants to Argentina starting in the mid-19th century significantly increased the country's population, even causing the number of porteños to triple between 1887 and 1915 from 500,000 to 1.5 million. Italian immigrants to Argentina. Late 19th century. Other significant European origins include German, Scottish, Norwegian, Polish, French, Portuguese, Swedish, Greek, Czech, Croatian, Dutch, Russian, Montenegrin, English, Hungarian and Bulgarian. In the 1980s and 1990s, there was a small wave of immigration from Romania and Ukraine. There is a minority of criollo citizens, dating back to the Spanish colonial days. The Criollo and Spanish-aboriginal (mestizo) population in the city has increased mostly as a result...

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University Education in Buenos Aires & Greater Argentina By Leor Szleifer

In 1918, a faction of students of the National University of Córdoba demanded a modern, democratic revision of the university's statutes. Since the 17th century, university education had been managed by the clergy or conservative upper-class (the first university in Argentina was founded by Jesuit priests), and often suppressed progressive ideas such as Darwin's theory of evolution.With the 1916 election of the less conservative Hipólito Yrigoyen to the Argentine presidency, these students became motivated to make their positions on reform clear. National University of Córdoba. In the Liminar Manifesto, the students demanded the following: Secular education - education free of the involvement of the Catholic Church No tuition University autonomy - the right for the university to choose its own staff without government...

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What is the Porteño Identity? by Leor Szleifer

  Strictly in terms of language, porteño translates to "port-dweller"; an individual who lives in or was born in a port city. In the context of Buenos Aires (yes, a port), the term carries an identity rich in the history and culture of the town. To the casual observer, or Argentines outside the city, a porteño carries the stereotype of being an arrogant know-it-all. But the true porteño takes this in stride and owns it. Porteños are further characterized as uninhibited, talkative, sensitive, cultured, and nostalgic; seemingly easygoing one moment and old souls the next. On the opposite side of the so-called "ego coin", porteños have a reputation for being highly self-critical. The egotistical nature of the porteño stereotype finds roots in the Buenos Aires street language of lunfardo; words such...

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A Mirror To Nature - Theatre in Buenos Aires by Leor Szleifer

Corrientes Avenue, in addition to its status as an icon of Buenos Aires culture and porteño identity, is a diverse hub for theatre recognized throughout the world. Sometimes called "the street that never sleeps", Corrientes has been referred to as the Broadway of Buenos Aires, housing such prestigious venues as the Teatro General San Martín, Teatro Gran Rex, and the self-aware Teatro Broadway. Teatro General San Martín. 1944 (reconstructed 1960). Its largest hall seats 566.   Teatro Gran Rex. 1937. 3300 seats. Teatro Broadway. 1930. Formerly a cinema, it was converted for theatre in the 1940s. 2265 seats. Buenos Aires' theatre roots can be traced back to 1786, during which what is widely considered to be the first Argentine stage play,...

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Architecture of Buenos Aires

Throughout history, Buenos Aires has stood apart as a strong instance of what a melting pot should be, bringing together multiple cultures to share and learn from each others' wares and art forms.Buenos Aires is nothing if not monumental, and there is no better example of this diversification of aesthetic than in the architecture of Buenos Aires. Immigration and early modern movements With the influx of European immigration in the late 19th and early 20th century came a departure from the style of simplistic baroque buildings known as Rioplatense (meaning "of Rio de la Plata"). A then-new neoclassical mode gradually began to work its way into the Buenos Aires skyline, drawing influence from primarily French and Italian styles. This style would last well into...

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